Tag Archives: learning

Final reflections

city-refraction-city-reflection-by-lrargerich-on-flickr

city-refraction-city-reflection-by-lrargerich-on-flickr

I am supposed to be reflecting on my aims for the SUNY technology in education course that’s just coming to an end.  When I look back at my original aims, and what I hoped to learn, here’s what I wrote:

  • How to use blogging/podcasting in the class room
    How to use google docs effectively

    How to be more imaginative in using ICT in the day to day of teaching
    How to include the above in UbD planning

I really didn’t know what to expect, to be honest.  Ignorance is bliss, as they say, and I was bumbling along in my own sweet way, totally unaware of many of the web 2.0 tools out there available for use for free in the classroom.  While I would not consider myself an expert, I have certainly learned a great deal towards achieving those aims, and more, over the past few weeks.  At the start, as you can tell by reading the first few blog posts here, I was reluctant, hesitant and skeptical about the use of the technology in my teaching.  I now feel excited, motivated and enthused about it.  I have even begun to experiment with some of it. 

One issue that I keep coming back to is time – podcasting, blogging, presentations – all very valuable.  The actual substance of the podcast or presentation doesn’t actually take that long to produce.  What takes the time is the editing and searching for the right photo or quote for your powerpoint.  Is this efficient use of a very scarce commodity?  And blogging – well – that takes on a life of it’s own!  Reading more important than writing in blogging.  Very time consuming as the more you read the more links you follow to more and more interesting websites till you realize you have just spent 3 hrs reading blogs with nothing concrete to show for it.

Collaboration is so important but I found working on the individual projects easier – I could do it whenever I had a few moments.  Group tasks required all of us to sit down at the same time, and if someone couldn’t be there, it was a no go.  This is something I should consider when assigning work to my students too.  The last task – designing a flat classroom project – was perhaps for me the most challenging.  Not sure why, exactly – maybe now having got my head around some of the new technology I need time to assimilate before working with others on a project like this.

Incorporating technology is great when it works.  When it doesn’t it leaves you frustrated beyond belief!  Here you are having spent ages coming up with a dynamic new way of learning for your students only to be thwarted 5 mins before the curtain goes up because of some technical hiccup.  I can’t help feeling a little bit of “why bother?” and I should have just done it the “old” way because that would have been easier… Maybe the need for a tech person on call to help in these emergencies, although I’ve no idea how this could be managed really.  I’m sure if an IT support person were to be in my lesson, then there would be no glitches, simply because they are there.   And again I think it comes back to our reasons for using the technology.  As Jose Picardo says on his excellent blog and in this post,  it is not just enough to plan to use ICT in our lessons, but it has to be meaningful to our students.  To them it is not particularly exciting or new – it is normal.  They are, remember, digital natives, and we are not.

open-door-by-cedro-on-flickr

open-door-by-cedro-on-flickr

Ideas for using podcasting in my classroom – put kids into groups of 2 or 3, and have them produce a podcast once per semester by rotation – maybe one produced every 2 weeks.  Something along the lines of “Biology in the news” or the like – short – 5 mins or so is enough.  Homework could be to listen to it and comment on the class blog….

I have always been a strong advocate for the IB DP program – and I still am.  It provides a far better HS experience than I ever had – students receive a great all-round education without specializing too early (a la A levels).  They do community service, EE, metacognition… all good stuff.  But over the past few weeks of this course I have been thinking… I miss teaching lower down.  For the first 10 years of my career I always taught the range from Grade 6 to 12, and enjoyed the diversity.  Yes, lots of prep, but it kept me interested and movitated.  In recent years I have become very “exam heavy” in my schedule.  First taking on Maths Studies along with Biology, meant all IB classes, then a move to the Philippines and all IB classes again.  Some of the enjoyment of teaching gets snuffed out when all you are worried about is getting through the syllabus and checking off the right number of lab hours. 

If I have learnt anything over the past few weeks of this course it is to be open to new ideas.  Read, read and read some more, and then try stuff out, and then form an opinion about whether it can be useful.  I’m historically good at the last part without having done the former. I also learnt that I have to take control of my PD, and not wait for someone to come knocking on my door to tell me about a great idea they have and would like to share.  By developing my own PLN, I am in charge of what I am learning, and who I am learning from, and when I learn it.  That is surely better than the “one size fits all” traditional PD that teachers often receive.  There is no criticism here – my current school is AMAZING at bringing in top notch, and at the forefront in their field, educators for us to work with and learn from, but my PLN is specific and targeted and there and ready to answer my questions….

Well – I guess I had a lot to reflect on!  So, I’ll stop there.

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

EARCOS education

It’s been a while since I attended a regional conference, and having recently returned from ETC 09 in Kota Kinabalu, Malaysian Borneo, I am unsure why.  I was left with a very positive impression and enjoyed the whole experience.  Here are a few of the things I learned, or relearned.

My fellow teachers are an amazing bunch of professionals, with great ideas and powers of motivation.

There are so many different presentation styles, just in the 3 keynotes, yet all are equally engaging.

There is hope for our planet – John Liu’s work on the Loess plateau in China shows what can be done if we set our minds to it.

There are ways to tackle academic honesty head on.  I attended a workshop by Michael Sheehan that outlined the latest research and gave constructive ideas on how to tackle this issue in schools.

Assessment is different to grading.  We need to assess so that our students can learn, but grading is not part of the learning process.  Bill and Ochan Powell gave some great workshops on this issue.  They also linked much of what they were saying to UbD and what can and cannot be differentiated.

The power of Twitter.  It was actual real life face to face conversations with people who use Twitter that convinced me to give it a go, not the responses to my blog posts on this issue.

Good professional development all round!

1 Comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Cellphones in class – yea or nay?

cell-phone-buttons-by-jonjon2k8-on-flickr

cell-phone-buttons-by-jonjon2k8-on-flickr

My latest reading has been to do with the issue of cellphones in schools.  There is a strong argument that allowing them into class is a major distraction, and that they should be banned.  There is an equally strong case for not only allowing them into class, but incorporating their use in lessons.  I did a little digging around and unearthed a few interesting articles on the subject.  The one I connected with most was this one by The Innovative Educator

Additionally, teachers need to experience, understand the educational value, and be comfortable with technology tools before using them to enhance teaching and learning. If we are exposing teachers to ways in to incorporate cells into the classroom, we are providing that teacher and classroom with tremendous power and access and an ability to model for students how to use a cell phone as a learning tool.

This is very true.  If we are aware of the potential drawbacks of this kind of approach – the most common one mentioned is cheating on tests – then we look for a workaround to this particular issue, such as no cellphones during tests.  The idea that students being able to communicate more freely with each other is surely a positive outcome in most cases.  Sure, there will always be the exception where a student abuses or misuses the privilege.  That happens now with internet access, but we still allow it in schools.  Not in my current school, but I envisage in many, there may be an issue of cost.  Cost of the actual phone, cost of the airtime, etc. that may discriminate against some students.  We don’t need the latest all singing all dancing cellphones for them to be useful.  Read this post by Cool Cat Teacher as to how she begins the school year.

My feeling is that we need to be a bit open-minded about this.  Using calculators is now expected, and taught.  Not that many years ago it was considered quite radical, if not cheating, to allow students to use them in a mathematics exam. 

7 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

New job title … children’s entertainer

how silly, how boring by kaswenden on flickr

how silly, how boring by kaswenden on flickr

Thanks to Kris for prompting this post….

Reading this article by Marc Prensky made me think about what school is for.  The premise is that students today are so used to having a variety of stimuli coming at them, they are bored in school where teachers don’t engage them sufficiently in the lessons.  [He makes another point about the curriculum not being relevant, but I’ll get to that later.]

True, many of us teachers could do a better job of involving our audience.  We all have off days when we give a less than brilliant performance, but here is my beef: schools are for learning.   And learning isn’t always fun and is very often hard work, and as teachers we do our best to plan interesting lessons within the constraints of timetables, curricula and external examinations… but at the end of the day we are devising ways to help our students learn skills, learn stuff.  And sometimes it can’t be an all-singing, all-dancing lesson.

He makes a good point about the curriculum in schools, though:

Yesterday’s education for tomorrow’s kids. Where is the programming, the genomics, the bioethics, the nanotech—the stuff of their time? It’s not there.

We do some modern stuff.  But change is slow.  There’s the need to get everybody to buy into it – teachers, parents, tertiary education establishments, employers, examination boards, students.  Speaking from a personal standpoint – as a Biology teacher – I have seen many changes in the syllabus over recent years.  We now teach about biotechnology and ethical issues in science.  We discuss stem cell research and cloning.  But we are always going to be behind in many ways.  We can’t know what discoveries will be made in the future that will shape our understanding of science.

So, back to the article.  While I accept a lot of what is written, I need to remember that I am a teacher first, children’s entertainer … no, not even second.  A few more things come inbetween – counselor, facilitator, motivator, coach, advisor, supervisor, guide, role model, etc.

4 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

Yoyo-ing about web 2.0

Reading Kim Cofino’s recent post and watching the presentations on 21st century learning, I am both daunted and inspired.  I feel like I have been in a coma for 10 years, and woken up to a whole new world that I don’t quite understand. 

First of all, the more I read, the more I feel out of the loop.  It seems as though there are thousands of teachers out there managing to incorporate new technology into their lessons.  They have umpteen ideas for its use and their students are benefiting from their expertise and guidance.  In trying to adapt, I am experiencing severe changes in emotion over this.  At times I feel excited at the prospects; at others I feel like I’m never going to get to grips with it all.

Teachermac talks about connectivism and so does this post over on Once a Teacher.  I am beginning to appreciate the need to develop my own pln, and to encourage my students to do the same.  I have to say, though, that this would certainly be easier if I worked in a laptop/tablet school.  I love the idea of collaborative note-taking [see Less Chalk, More Talk] and have begun taking steps towards this.  A colleague set up a wiki for his students to use in IB Biology.  The original idea was that the students themselves contribute to it by completing a series of questions from the syllabus.  However, these great intentions became derailed somewhat as he discovered only a handful of students could work on the wiki at one time.  In the end, he wrote the bulk of the answers himself, which defeated the purpose of student involvement.  This took a huge amount of time and effort on his part to set up, but now, although it is a great online resource, it is simply like a textbook rather than an interactive tool.

So, I suppose, I am basically reflecting here on where to concentrate my efforts.  I recognize I cannot do it all.  I know I have to be selective in where my energy goes.  This makes it all the more important to choose right.

7 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

It’s not about the technology

What I am getting from reading all these edublogs is this – and others have alluded to it in their blogs, so I will not claim to be an original thinker here – it’s not about the technology.  It’s about good teaching practice.  It’s about engaging students in the learning process, motivating them towards deeper understanding, helping them develop skills in collaboration, application, evaluation, analysis and reflection.  Web 2.0 gives us some new toys to play with, and perhaps makes lessons more relevant to the world of the students we teach, but essentially, it is about inspiring young people to learn, enjoy learning and make connections.  Using technology will not necessarily make me a better teacher, but thinking about how to use it to make the learning process more interesting and exciting for my students, will.

5 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

Turn off the computer?

Unplugged?At the risk of having rotten tomatoes thrown at me, and being ostracised from the blogging community, here is something that occurred to me today in class. 

I was lecturing/encouraging/suggesting that my students devote some time over this coming 3-day weekend to revision for their upcoming mock exams.  I went further and advised them to turn off their phones and computers while doing so.  To devote some uninterrupted time to active learning of the material they will be tested on, without the “distraction” of email, texts, internet, SMS, facebook, etc.  Was this bad advice?  I don’t think so.  Yes they can benefit from an online community of fellow students, help each other understand concepts, get ideas from peers, but I think there has to come a time when they need to focus purely on the revision and not multitask.  Am I expecting too much from them in asking them to do this when they are so used to being connected 24/7?  Is there a new, more effective way to revise material that I don’t yet know about?

I’m ducking behind my computer here!

Image from http://z.hubpages.com/u/136804_f260.jpg

11 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized